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Species, complete list

Addax

The addax (Addax nasomaculatus), also known as the white antelope and the screwhorn antelope, is an antelope of the genus Addax, that lives in the Sahara desert. It was first described by Henri de Blainville in 1816. As suggested by its alternative name, this pale antelope has long, twisted horns - typically 22 to 31 in in females and 28 to 33 in. in males. Males stand from 41 to 45 in. at the shoulder, with females at 37 to 43 in. The colour of the coat depends on the season - in the winter, it is greyish-brown with white hindquarters and legs, and long, brown hair on the head, neck, and shoulders; in the summer, the coat turns almost completely white or sandy blonde.

Trophy fee : $5,000

Alpine ibex

The Alpine ibex (Capra ibex), also known as the steinbock or bouquetin, is a species of wild goat that lives in the mountains of the European Alps. It is a sexually dimorphic species with larger males who carry larger, curved horns. The coat colour is typically brownish grey. Alpine ibex tend to live in steep, rough terrain above the snow line. Four distinct groups exist; adult male groups, female-offsping groups, groups of young individuals, and mixed sex groups. Compared with other members of its genus, the Alpine ibex has a short, broad head and a duller coat. It has brownish grey hair over most of the body, a pale abdomen and slightly darker markings on the chin and throat and in a stripe along the back.

Trophy fee : $20,000

Bison

The American bison (Bison bison), also commonly known as the American buffalo, is a North American species of bison that once roamed the grasslands of North America in massive herds. They became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle, and have made a recent resurgence largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves. Their historical range roughly comprised a triangle between the Great Bear Lake in Canada's far northwest, south to the Mexican states of Durango and Nuevo Leon, and east to the Atlantic Seaboard of the United States from New York to Georgia and down to Florida.

Trophy fee : $7,500

Aoudad Sheep

The Aoudad or Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) is a species of caprid (goat-antelope) native to rocky mountains in North Africa. Six subspecies have been described. Although it is rare in its native North Africa, it has been introduced to North America, southern Europe, and elsewhere. Barbary sheep stand 2.6 to 3.3 ft tall at the shoulder and weigh 88 to 309 lb. They are a sandy-brown color, darkening with age, with a slightly lighter underbelly and a darker line along the back. Upper parts and the outer parts of the legs are a uniform reddish-brown or grayish-brown. There is some shaggy hair on the throat and a sparse mane. The horns curve outwards, backwards, then inwards, and reach up to 20 in.

Trophy fee Ram : $3,500 , Ewe : $250

Arabian Oryx

The Arabian oryx or white oryx is a medium-sized antelope with a distinct shoulder bump, long, straight horns, and a tufted tail. It is a bovid, and the smallest member of the Oryx genus, native to desert and steppe areas of the Arabian Peninsula. An Arabian oryx stands about 1 m (39 in) high at the shoulder and weighs around 70 kg (150 lb). Its coat is an almost luminous white, the undersides and legs are brown, and black stripes occur where the head meet the neck, on the forehead, on the nose, and going from the horn down across the eye to the mouth. Both sexes have long, straight or slightly curved, ringed horns which are 50 to 75 cm (20 to 30 in) long.

Trophy fee : $7,500

Armenian Mouflon

The Armenian mouflon, also known as the Armenian sheep, Armenian wild sheep, Armenian red sheep, or Trans-Caucasian sheep is an endangered subspecies of mouflon endemic to Iran, Armenia, and Nakhchivan. The Iranian red sheep lives mostly in open rough terrain at medium or high altitudes, where they inhabit rocky hill country, lowland and highland steppes, and rocky semi-deserts, and grass-covered slopes and alpine meadows. They spend the summer at the highest elevations, right below the permanent snow. In winter they move lower and may come into the valleys. They live in small or larger herds, and in the summer the older males live singly or in separate groups. They may live up to 18 years.

Trophy fee : $3,250

Axis deer

The Axis deer also known as a chital or cheetal, is a deer found in the Indian subcontinent and Sri Lanka. The species was first described by German naturalist Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben in 1777. The chital is a moderately sized deer. Males reach nearly 90 centimetres (35 in) and females 70 centimetres (28 in) at the shoulder; the head-and-body length is around 1.7 metres (5.6 ft). While males weigh 30–75 kilograms (66–165 lb), the lighter females weigh 25–45 kilograms (55–99 lb). Exceptionally large males can weigh up to 98 to 110 kg (216 to 243 lb).[12] The tail, 20 centimetres (7.9 in) long, is marked by a dark stripe that stretches along its length. The species is sexually dimorphic: males are larger than females, and antlers are present only on males.

Trophy fee Buck : $3,750 , Doe : $500

Barasingha

The Barasingha, also called swamp deer, is a deer species distributed in the Indian subcontinent. Populations in northern and central India are fragmented, and two isolated populations occur in southwestern Nepal. The barasingha is a large deer with a shoulder height of 44 to 46 in (110 to 120 cm) and a head-to-body length of nearly 6 ft (180 cm). Its hair is rather woolly and yellowish brown above but paler below, with white spots along the spine. The throat, belly, inside of the thighs and beneath the tail is white. In summer the coat becomes bright rufous-brown. The neck is maned. Females are paler than males. Young are spotted. Average antlers measure 30 in (76 cm) round the curve with a girth of 5 in (13 cm) at mid beam.[6] A record antler measured 104.1 cm (41.0 in) round the curve.

Trophy fee : $4,500

Blackbuck

The Blackbuck also known as the Indian antelope, is an antelope commonly found in India. The blackbuck is the sole extant member of the genus Antilope. The species was first described by Swedish zoologist Carl Linnaeus in 1758. Two subspecies are recognised. It stands up to 74 to 84 cm (29 to 33 in) high at the shoulder. Males weigh 20–57 kilograms (44–126 lb), an average of 38 kilograms (84 lb). Females are lighter, weighing 20–33 kilograms (44–73 lb) or 27 kilograms (60 lb) on an average. The long, ringed horns, 35–75 centimetres (14–30 in) long, are generally present only on males, though females may develop horns as well.

Trophy fee : $3,000

Blesbok

The blesbok or blesbuck is an antelope endemic to South Africa. Physically, rams and ewes are remarkably similar. Their mass can be as much as 85 kg. A characteristic of the blesbok is the prominent white blaze on the face and a horizontal brown strip which divides this blaze above the eyes. Body colour is brown with a lighter-coloured saddle on the back, and the rump an even lighter shade. The legs are brown with a white patch behind the top part of the front legs. The length of their horns averages at around 38 cm. Male adult blesbok average around 70 kg; females average lower, at around 61 kg.

Trophy fee : $6,500

Bongo

The Bongo antelope is a herbivorous, mostly nocturnal forest ungulate. It is among the largest of the African forest antelope species. Bongos are characterised by a striking reddish-brown coat, black and white markings, white-yellow stripes and long slightly spiralled horns. Indeed, bongos are the only tragelaphid in which both sexes have horns. They have a complex social interaction and are found in African dense forest mosaics. Adults of both sexes are similar in size. Adult height is about 1.1 to 1.3 m (3.6 to 4.3 ft) at the shoulder and length is 2.15 to 3.15 m (7.1 to 10.3 ft), including a tail of 45–65 cm (18–26 in). Both sexes have heavy spiral horns.

Trophy fee : $35,000

Cape Buffalo

The African buffalo or Cape buffalo is a large African bovine. The adult buffalo's horns are its characteristic feature; they have fused bases, forming a continuous bone shield referred to as a "boss". It is widely regarded as a very dangerous animal. Being a member of the "big five" game family, the Cape buffalo is a sought-after trophy in hunting.

Trophy fee : $50,000

Catalina Goat

Catalina Goat ipso text here

Trophy fee : $1,000

Common Lechwe

The common lechwe is an antelope found in wetlands of south central Africa. Lechwe stand 90 to 100 cm (35 to 39 in) at the shoulder and weigh from 70 to 120 kg (150 to 260 lb). They are golden brown with white bellies. Males are darker in colour, but general hue varies depending on subspecies. The long, spiral-structured horns are vaguely lyre-shaped, they are found only in males. The hind legs are somewhat longer in proportion than in other antelopes, to ease long-distance running in marshy soil.

Trophy fee : $6,000

Corsican Ram

Corsican Ram ipso text here

Trophy fee : $3,000

Dama Gazelle

The Dama Gazelle lives in Africa in the Sahara desert and the Sahel. This critically endangered species has disappeared from most of its former range due to overhunting and habitat loss, and natural populations only remain in Chad, Mali, and Niger. Both sexes usually have medium-length ringed horns curved like an "S". Males' horns are about 35 cm (14 in) long, while females' horns are much shorter. The gazelles' heads are small with narrow muzzles, their eyes are relatively large, and they have longer necks and legs than most gazelles. These animals are between 90 and 120 cm (35 and 47 in) tall at the shoulder, weigh between 35 and 75 kg (77 and 165 lb)

Trophy fee : $10,000

Dybowski Sika

The Dybowski Sika is a subspecies of deer, the largest of the 14 subspecies of sika deer. The Manchurian sika deer was formerly found in Manchuria (northeastern China), Korea, and the Russian Far East. Body length is 155 cm (61 in), and the tail is up to 20 cm (7.9 in) long. The height at the withers is 75–110 cm (30–43 in). Females weigh up to 80–90 kg (180–200 lb) and bulls up to 110–160 kg (240–350 lb).

Trophy fee : $5,000

Eland

The Eland is a savannah and plains antelope found in East and Southern Africa. It is a species of the family Bovidae and genus Taurotragus. It was first described by Peter Simon Pallas in 1766. An adult male is around 1.6 metres (5') tall at the shoulder (females are 20 centimetres (8") shorter) and can weigh up to 942 kg (2077 lbs) with an average of 500–600 kilograms (1,100–1,300 lb, 340–445 kilograms (750–980 lb) for females). It is the second largest antelope in the world, being slightly smaller on average than the giant eland. The horns of males are thicker and shorter than those of females (males' horns are 43–66 centimetres (17–26 in) long and females' are 51–69 centimetres (20–27 in) long)

Trophy fee : $6,500

Eld's Deer

Eld's Deer are generally of medium size and are similar to the size and shape of the barasingha. The species has a very regal and graceful Cervus physique. Its legs are thin and long, and has a long body with a large head on a thin neck. The throat of a male has a thick mane of long hair. Males (stags) are taller and heavier than the females (hinds or does). The antlers, bow- or lyre-shaped, do not grow upwards, but tend to grow outwards and then inwards; a smaller branch grows towards the front of the head. The brow tines are especially long and noticeable. The brow-antlered deer is so named because they have long brow tines. They shed their antlers every year, with the largest size attained during the breeding season

Trophy fee : $10,000

Elk

The Elk is one of the largest species within the deer family, Cervidae, in the world, and one of the largest land mammals in North America and eastern Asia. Elk are more than twice as heavy as mule deer and have a more reddish hue to their hair coloring, as well as large, buff colored rump patches and smaller tails. Moose are larger and darker than elk; bulls have distinctively different antlers. Elk gather in herds, while moose are solitary. Elk cows average 225 to 241 kg (496 to 531 lb), stand 1.3 m (4.3 ft) at the shoulder, and are 2.1 m (6.9 ft) from nose to tail. Bulls are some 40% larger than cows at maturity, weighing an average of 320 to 331 kg (705 to 730 lb), standing 1.5 m (4.9 ft) at the shoulder and averaging 2.45 m (8.0 ft) in length.

Trophy fee Bull : $8,500-$20,000, Cow : $1,250

European Mouflon

The European Mouflon is a subspecies group of the wild sheep (Ovis orientalis). Mouflon have red-brown, short-haired coats with dark back-stripes and light-colored saddle patches. The males are horned; some females are horned, while others are polled. The horns of mature rams are curved in almost one full revolution (up to 85 cm). Mouflon have shoulder heights of about 0.9 m and body weights of 50 kg (males) and 35 kg (females). Their normal habitats are steep mountainous woods near tree lines. In winter, they migrate to lower altitudes.

Trophy fee : $3,500

Fallow Deer

The Fallow Deer The fallow deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. This common species is native to western Eurasia. The male fallow deer is known as a buck, the female is a doe, and the young a fawn. Adult bucks are 140–160 cm (55–63 in) long with a 85–95 cm (33–37 in) shoulder height, and typically 60–100 kg (130–220 lb) in weight; does are 130–150 cm (51–59 in) long with a 75–85 cm (30–33 in) shoulder height, and 30–50 kg (66–110 lb) in weight. The largest bucks may measure 190 cm (75 in) long and weigh 150 kg (330 lb).[5] Fawns are born in spring at about 30 cm (12 in) and weigh around 4.5 kg (9.9 lb).

Trophy fee Buck : $6,500 , Doe : $400

Four Horn Ram

Four Horn Ram may have from two to six horns, but most commonly have four. The most common color is black and white. Jacobs are usually raised for their wool, meat, and hides. They are also kept as pets and ornamental animals, and have been used as guard animals to protect farm property from theft or vandalism and defend other livestock against predators. Mature rams (males) weigh about 54 to 82 kg (120 to 180 lb), while ewes (females) weigh about 36 to 54 kg (80 to 120 lb).

Trophy fee : $3,000

Gemsbok

The Gemsbok is is a large antelope in the Oryx genus. It is native to the arid regions of Southern Africa, such as the Kalahari Desert. Gemsbok are light brownish-grey to tan in colour, with lighter patches toward the bottom rear of the rump. Gemsbok are the largest species in the Oryx genus. They stand about 1.2 m (3.9 ft) at the shoulder. The body length can vary from 190 to 240 cm (75 to 94 in) and the tail measures 45 to 90 cm (18 to 35 in). Male gemsbok can weigh between 180 and 240 kg (400 and 530 lb), while females weigh 100–210 kg (220–460 lb).

Trophy fee : $7,500

Grant's Gazelle

Grant's Gazelle is a species of gazelle distributed from northern Tanzania to South Sudan and Ethiopia, and from the Kenyan coast to Lake Victoria. The Grant's gazelle stands 75–95 cm (30–37 in) at the shoulder. The females weigh from 35 to 50 kg (77 to 110 lb) and males from 50 to 80 kg (110 to 180 lb).[6][4] Its coat is a beige orange on the back with a white belly. The Grant's gazelle looks similar to a Thomson's gazelle, except it is much larger and has lyre-shaped horns which are stout at the base, clearly ringed, and measuring 45–81 cm (18–32 in) long.

Trophy fee : $7,500

Hawaiian Black Ram

Hawaiian Black Rams have a thick black coat and are usually black all over, although some sport a white muzzle. Like the other species of sheep of this type, the horns grow up, back, down, forward, up again, and then tip out. The horns of young males are jet black, but can turn brown to light tan as they age. Horns can grow to length of 40+ inches. Females are often devoid of horns. Black Hawaiians have a mane that ranges from 3 to 8 inches. Males can weigh up to 140 to 150 pounds.

Trophy fee : $3,000

Himalayan Tahr

The Himalayan Tahr is a large ungulate native to the Himalayas in southern Tibet, northern India and Nepal. The Himalayan tahr has a small head, small pointed ears, large eyes, and horns that vary between males and females.[5] Their horns reach a maximum length of 46 centimetres (18 in). Himalayan tahrs are sexually dimorphic, with females being smaller in weight and in size and having smaller horns. The horn is curved backwards, preventing injury during mating season when headbutting is a common mating ritual among males. The average male tahr usually weighs around 73 kg with females averaging 36 kg and is shorter in height than in length.

Trophy fee : $5,000

Hog Deer

The Hog Deer is a small deer whose habitat ranges from Pakistan, through northern India, to mainland southeast Asia, which inhabits much of the Indo-Gangetic Plains of Pakistan, northern India, Nepal, Bangladesh, southwestern Yunnan Province in China, all the way to western Thailand. A mature hog deer stag stands about 70 cm at the shoulder and weighs approximately 50 kg while hinds are much smaller, standing about 61 cm and weighing in the vicinity of 30 kg. They are very solidly built with a long body and relatively short legs and the line of the back slopes upward from the shoulders to a high rump. The ears are rounded; older animals tend to become light coloured in the face and neck.

Trophy fee : $3,500

Impala

The Impala is a medium-sized African antelope. It is the type species of the genus Aepyceros and belongs to the family Bovidae. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability. Males reach approximately 75–92 cm (30–36 in) at the shoulder, while females reach 70–85 cm (28–33 in). Males grow 45–92 cm (18–36 in)-long slender, lyre-shaped horns. They are circular in section and hollow at the base. Their arch-like structure helps the animal to interlock the horns and throw off the opponent.

Trophy fee : $5,500

Iranian Red Sheep

The Iranian Red Sheep ipso text here

Trophy fee : $3,000

Kudu

The Kudu The kudus are two species of antelope of the genus Tragelaphus: Lesser kudu, Tragelaphus imberbis, of eastern Africa Greater kudu, Tragelaphus strepsiceros, of eastern and southern Africa. Greater kudu bulls tend to be much larger than the cows, and vocalize much more, utilizing low grunts, clucks, humming, and gasping.[citation needed] The bulls also have large manes running along their throats, and large horns with two and a half twists, which, were they to be straightened, would reach an average length of 120 cm (47 in), with the record being 187.64 cm (73.87 in). This is one of the largest species of antelope. Bulls weigh 190–270 kg (420–600 lb), with a maximum of 315 kg (694 lb).

Trophy fee : $15,000

Markhor

The Markhor is a large species of wild goat that is found in northeastern Afghanistan, northern and central Pakistan, Kashmir, southern Tajikistan, southern Uzbekistan and in the Himalayas. Markhor stand 65 to 115 centimetres (26 to 45 in) at the shoulder, 132 to 186 centimetres (52 to 73 in) in length and weigh from 32 to 110 kilograms (71 to 243 lb). The horns of males can grow up to 160 cm (63 in) long, and up to 25 cm (10 in) in females.

Trophy fee : $12,500

Muntjac

The Muntjac also known as barking deer and Mastreani deer, are small deer of the genus Muntiacus. Muntjacs are the oldest known deer, thought to have begun appearing 15–35 million years ago, with remains found in Miocene deposits in France, Germany and Poland. The present-day species are native to South Asia and can be found in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, the Indonesian islands, Taiwan and Southern China. The muntjac grows to 0.5 metres (1 ft 8 in) high at the shoulder,[6] 0.95 m (3 ft 1 in) in length, and weighs between 10 and 18 kilograms (22 and 40 lb) when fully grown.

Trophy fee : $3,500

Nile Lechwe

The Nile Lechwe or Mrs Gray's lechwe is a species of antelope. Males are an average of 165 cm (65 in) long and 100–105 cm (39–41 in) tall at the shoulders, and weigh between 90 and 120 kg (200 and 260 lb), while females are an average of 135 cm (53 in) long, 80–85 cm (31–33 in) tall at the shoulders, and weigh 60–90 kg (130–200 lb). Nile lechwes live an average of 10 to 11.5 years, and most uncommonly 19 years. They have long, ridge-structured horns which are vaguely 'S'-shaped in profile. The horns, 50–60 cm (20–24 in) long, are strongly ridged at their bases and are curved at the tips.

Trophy fee : $15,000

Nilgai

The Nilgai or blue bull, sometimes called the neelghae or nilgau, is the largest Asian antelope. The nilgai is the largest antelope of Asia. It stands 1–1.5 metres (3.3–4.9 ft) at the shoulder. The horns are 15–24 centimetres (5.9–9.4 in) long but generally shorter than 30 centimetres (12 in). Smooth and straight, the horns may point backward or forward. Males weigh 109–288 kilograms (240–635 lb); the maximum weight recorded is 308 kilograms (679 lb).

Trophy fee : $4,500

Nubian Ibex

The Nubian Ibex is a desert-dwelling goat species found in mountainous areas of Algeria, Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Egypt, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Yemen, and Sudan. Nubian ibexes stand around 65–75 cm (2.1-2.6 ft) tall at the shoulder and weigh around 50 kilograms (110 lb). Nubian ibexes are a light tan color, with a white underbelly, in males there is also a dark brown stripe down the back. Nubian ibexes have long thin horns which extend up and then backwards and down. In males these reach around a metre in length while in females they are much smaller (around 30 cm or 12 in).

Trophy fee : $12,000

Nyala

The Nyala also called inyala, is a spiral-horned antelope native to southern Africa. The body length is 135–195 cm (53–77 in), and it weighs 55–140 kg (121–309 lb). The coat is rusty or rufous brown in females and juveniles, but grows a dark brown or slate grey, often tinged with blue, in adult males. Females and young males have ten or more white stripes on their sides. Only males have horns, 60–83 cm (24–33 in) long and yellow-tipped. There are one or two twists.

Trophy fee : $12,000

Pere David's Deer

The Pere David's Deer also known as the milu or elaphure, is a species of deer that are mostly found in captivity. The adult Père David's deer reaches a head-and-body length of up to 1.9–2.2 meters (6.2–7.2 ft) and stands about 1.2 meters (3.9 ft) tall at the shoulder.[7] The tail is relatively long for a deer, measuring 50–66 centimeters (20–26 in) when straightened. Weight is between 135 and 200 kilograms (298 and 441 lb). The branched antlers are unique in that the long tines point backward, while the main beam extends almost directly upward.

Trophy fee : $7,500

Red Stag Deer

The Red Stag Deer is one of the largest deer species. The red deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Asia Minor, Iran, parts of western Asia, and central Asia. The male (stag or hart) red deer is typically 175 to 250 cm (69 to 98 in) long and weighs 160 to 240 kg (350 to 530 lb); the female (hind) is 160 to 210 cm (63 to 83 in) long and weighs 120 to 170 kg (260 to 370 lb). The tail adds another 12 to 19 cm (4.7 to 7.5 in) and shoulder height is about 95 to 130 cm (37 to 51 in).[8] In Scotland, stags average 201 cm (79 in) in head-and-body length and 122 cm (48 in) high at the shoulder and females average 180 cm (71 in) long and 114 cm (45 in) tall. Only the stags have antlers, which start growing in the spring and are shed each year, usually at the end of winter. Antlers typically measure 71 cm (28 in) in total length and weigh 1 kg (2.2 lb), although large ones can grow to 115 cm (45 in) and weigh 5 kg (11 lb)

Trophy fee Stag : $1,500-$15,000

Rusa Deer

The Rusa Deer Sunda sambar is a deer native to the islands of Java, Bali and Timor in Indonesia. When alarmed, a rusa stag lets out an extremely loud honk. This is an alarm call and will alert any other deer in the vicinity. Rusa deer are recognised by their large ears, the light tufts of hair above the eyebrows, the antlers appearing too large for their body size.

Trophy fee : $3,500

Sable

The Sable is an antelope which inhabits wooded savannah in East Africa south of Kenya, and in Southern Africa. Males reach about 117–140 cm (46–55 in) at the shoulder, while females are slightly shorter. Males typically weigh 235 kg (518 lb) and females 220 kg (490 lb). Both sexes have ringed horns which arch backward. In females, these can reach 61–102 cm (24–40 in), while in males they are 81–165 cm (32–65 in) long.

Trophy fee : $15,000

Scimitar Horned Oryx

The Scimitar Horned Oryx also known as the Sahara oryx, is a species of Oryx now extinct in the wild. It formerly inhabited all of North Africa. This spiral-horned antelope stands a little more than 1 metre (3.3 ft) at the shoulder. The males weigh 140–210 kg (310–460 lb) and the females weigh 91–140 kg (201–309 lb). The horns are long, thin, and symmetrical; they curve backwards (a distinctive feature of this species) and can reach 1.0 to 1.2 m (3 ft 3 in to 3 ft 11 in) on both the males and the females.

Trophy fee : $5,000

Springbok

The Springbok is a medium-sized brown and white antelope of southwestern Africa. Springbok often go into bouts of repeated high leaps of up to 2 m (6 ft 7 in) into the air in a practice known as pronking or stotting. The head-and-body length is typically between 120 and 150 cm (47 and 59 in), and horns are present in both sexes. Males have thick horns about 35–49 cm (14–19 in) long.

Trophy fee : $6,000

Sika Deer

The Sika Deer is a species of deer native to much of East Asia, and introduced to various other parts of the world. Previously found from northern Vietnam in the south to the Russian Far East in the north. The color of the pelage ranges from mahogany to black, and white individuals are also known. During winter, the coat becomes darker and shaggier and the spots less prominent, and a mane forms on the back of the males' necks.[6] They are medium-sized herbivores, though they show notable size variation across their several subspecies and considerable sexual dimorphism, with males invariably much larger than females. They can vary from 50 to 110 cm (20 to 43 in) tall at the shoulder and from 95 to 180 cm (37 to 71 in) in head-and-body length. The tail measures about 7.5–13 cm (3.0–5.1 in) long.

Trophy fee : $2,750

Sitatunga

The Sitatunga or marshbuck is a swamp-dwelling antelope found throughout central Africa, centering on the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cameroon, parts of Southern Sudan, Ghana, Botswana, Zambia, Gabon, Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. The head-and-body length is typically between 136–177 cm (54–70 in) in males and 104–146 cm (41–57 in) in females. The wedge-like shape and lowering of the head, coupled with the backward bend of the horns (in males) provides for easy navigation through dense vegetation.

Trophy fee : $10,000

Texas Dall Ram

The Texas Dall Ram ipso text here

Trophy fee : $3,000

Thomson Gazelle

The Thomson Gazelle is one of the best-known gazelles. Thomson's gazelles are 55 to 82 cm (22 to 32 in) tall, body length of 80 to 120 cm (31 to 47 in), and weigh 15 to 25 kg (33 to 55 lb) (females), 20 to 35 kg (44 to 77 lb) (males). Their horns are long and pointed with slight curvature. It is considered by some to be a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle.

Trophy fee : $5,500

Transcaspian Urial Ram

The Transcaspian Urial Ram is a subspecies group of the wild sheep Ovis orientalis. Noticeable features are the reddish-brown long fur that fades during winter; males are characterized by a black ruff stretching from the neck to the chest and large horns. It is found in western central Asia. Urial males have large horns, curling outwards from the top of the head turning in to end somewhere behind the head; females have shorter, compressed horns.

Trophy fee : $10,000

Waterbuck

The Waterbuck is a large antelope found widely in sub-Saharan Africa. Males reach approximately 127 cm (50 in) at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm (47 in). Males typically weigh 198–262 kg (437–578 lb) and females 161–214 kg (355–472 lb). The coat colour varies from brown to grey. The long, spiral horns, present only on males, curve backward, then forward and are 55–99 cm (22–39 in) long. The head-and-body length is typically between 177–235 cm (70–93 in) and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm (47 and 54 in).

Trophy fee : $5,000

Water Buffalo

The Water Buffalo or domestic Asian water buffalo is a large bovid originating in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and China. Their horns grow outward, and curve in a semicircle, but always remain more or less on the plane of the forehead. The tail is short, reaching only to the hocks. Height at withers is 129–133 cm (51–52 in) for males, and 120–127 cm (47–50 in) for females. They range in weight from 300–550 kg (660–1,210 lb), but weights of over 1,000 kg (2,200 lb) have also been observed.

Trophy fee Bull : $4,500, Cow : $1,250

Whitetail Deer

The Whitetail Deer is a medium-sized deer native to the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, and South America as far south as Peru and Bolivia. The white-tailed deer is highly variable in size, generally following Bergmann's rule that the average size is larger farther away from the Equator. Males regrow their antlers every year. A buck's inside spread can be from 3 to 25 in (8–64 cm).

Trophy fee Buck : $2,000-$17,500, Doe : $200

Wildebeest

The Wildebeest also called gnus or wildebai, are a genus of antelopes, Connochaetes. The blue wildebeest is the bigger of the two species. The horns of blue wildebeest protrude to the side then curve downwards before curving up back towards the skull, while the horns of the black wildebeest curve forward then downward before curving upwards at the tips. Wildebeest can live more than forty years.

Trophy fee : $6,000

Yak

The Yak is a long-haired bovid found throughout the Himalaya region of southern Central Asia, the Tibetan Plateau and as far north as Mongolia and Russia. Wild yak adults stand about 1.6 to 2.2 m (5.2 to 7.2 ft) tall at the shoulder and weigh 305–1,000 kg (672–2,205 lb). In males, the horns sweep out from the sides of the head, and then curve forward; they typically range from 48 to 99 cm (19 to 39 in) in length.

Trophy fee : $5,000

Zebra

Zebra are several species of African equids united by their distinctive black and white striped coats. Their stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small harems to large herds. The common plains zebra is about 1.2–1.3 m (47–51 in) at the shoulder with a body ranging from 2–2.6 m (6.6–8.5 ft) long with an 0.5 m (20 in) tail. It can weigh up to 350 kg (770 lb), males being slightly bigger than females.

Trophy fee : $4,000